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Christian Bale Sequel to Dark Knight-Maybe

March 18, 2008

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I can’t claim the credit for this one but this is directly sourced from Entertainment weekly for you guys

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Where are you in the Terminator process right now?
CHRISTIAN BALE: There are some wonderful people who have been brought in, and we are working to re-create that world.

Do you have a script?
We’re in the process of doing that, we’re working on that, et cetera.

Do you have a sense of when Terminator is going to start or how long it’s going to take?
I got a sense of it, but, you know, it’s important to make sure that you start a movie when you’re ready, instead of just starting it on a date, regardless. And so we’ll start when we’re ready.

In the meantime, you’re working on Michael Mann’s Depression-era gangster saga Public Enemies.
Yes, yes, that’s actually what I’m doing right now…. I don’t actually start until next week, but so far, just loving it, loving working with Michael, the research, the detail, liking it very much.

How do you feel about the way people discuss the projects you pick? You’ve always done a mix of genres and movies — in the past year or so, for example, you did a Western [3:10 to Yuma], you worked with Werner Herzog [on Rescue Dawn] — but people sometimes focus on the blockbusters. Does that frustrate you?
I certainly don’t do that for anybody but myself. I enjoy making all sorts, and it’s directors who I very much like working with. I don’t really give a damn if it’s a low-budget movie or if it’s a big-budget movie — it’s whatever serves the movie and serves the story best. I certainly enjoy watching both of those kinds of movies, so why don’t I go out there and make both? I don’t really understand why I’d have any frustration whatsoever. What? Frustration that people can’t say, ”Well, you’re predictable as hell, aren’t you? You just do the big studio ones. You just do the indie ones”? You know? That would be frustrating.

Is there a different mindset that goes into making different kinds of movies?
Listen, I think that there probably is, but I don’t really try to articulate that to myself. Because I do think that a story is a story, and I will see many low, low-budget movies that just are way better than some mega-budget movie. So a story’s a story, and I’m going to be interested in a story that I want to go see. And I’ve made mistakes in the past. I hope that that has given me experience, and hopefully I’ll make fewer mistakes in the future.

But you had a good time doing the work…
[Smiles] Um, not always! [Laughs]

Don’t you seek having a good time at least, or some sort of edification?
Well, that’s a funny thing. Everybody considers enjoyment in different ways. Some people would consider ”Hey, every day was a blast on the set, we all got along and went out drinking together after” [as enjoyable]. And, hey, that can be fun. But also I get a lot of satisfaction out of just nonstop work…. Actually, that gives me the most satisfaction, because I’m setting aside time to work on a movie. I don’t necessarily want my life to be the same as it is when I’m not working. I don’t really feel the need for hanging out too much or whatever; I enjoy taking it very seriously. And I absolutely can see the ridiculous side of that as well, because, you know, the majority of jobs are ridiculous. [His interviewer raises his hand, jokingly] Exactly! [He raises his hand and smiles] Both of our hands are up in that. But you have to recognize that and say, ”Regardless, I’m telling a story and I take that seriously, and I enjoy that immensely.” So, to me, that is having fun, when I’m working my ass off. And ultimately, when I’m finished, then I’m really going to enjoy myself in life, because I’ve actually been satisfied in my work. I mean, if I’ve done something that I’ve felt hasn’t really worked or that I haven’t really had to work at, then I can’t enjoy my free time as much because I’m feeling like I have to go answer to myself why the last thing may or may not have gone so well. And I’ve been very fortunate with directors — literally, in the last five years or so, really fantastic collaborations with people — so I’ve had that satisfaction for quite some time.

I know — you’ve got Michael Mann now, you worked with Terrence Malick… You’re running out of the big guys.
Well, you know, hopefully…

There’ll be new ones, another Christopher Nolan comes along…
Absolutely, Christopher Nolan is a new director who will be around for many years to come, I truly think. He’s one of the finest out there. Also, you can revisit working with these same people — hopefully it ain’t just a one-time deal and that’s the end. I worked with Todd Haynes a couple of times [on Velvet Goldmine and I’m Not There] and enjoyed that. I very much like collaborating with Brad Anderson [on The Machinist], and we’re kind of looking to do something else together. Jim Mangold [his 3:10 to Yuma director] as well. It’s been very nice. I’ve been a lucky bastard.

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One comment

  1. […] RadioFreeUBU wrote an interesting post today onHere’s a quick excerpt I can’t claim the credit for this one but this is directly sourced from Entertainment weekly for you guys ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Where are you in the Terminator process right now? CHRISTIAN BALE: There are some wonderful people who have been brought in, and we are working to re-create that world. Do you have a script? We’re in the process of doing that, we’re working on that, et cetera. Do you have a sense of when Terminator is going to start or how long it’s going to take? I got a s […]



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